Heart healthy eating isn’t only for those who live in the Mediterranean.  Learn how to integrate Mediterranean eating and cooking techniques into your daily routine.  From the basics of nutrition to simple recipes, you will walk away with a better understanding about eating Mediterranean style and how to begin living healthier!  

Thank you for attending my Mediterranean Cooking and Eating presentation. Below you’ll find the recipe I demonstrated along with insights and questions from the presentation.  Also, here’s a handy kitchen tips download with kitchen prep essentials. Learn how to store and perserve herbs, freezing grains, vegetables, meats and more.
Have Chef Marshall O’Brien be your trusted chef resource for all your food/cooking questions – enjoy!

6/5/12 Insights & Questions

1. Olive oils – Oils –  There is a lot of information out there and frankly depending on what you read, it can be confusing. I use Spectrum brand oils so here’s a link with a wealth of knowledgeon the various types and purposes for using oils. As I mentioned during the presentation, we use extra virgin olive oil on our salads, raw veggies and for finishing. We use a regular olive oil for cooking. Sesame is good too, but it’s a strong flavor. We use a good quality coconut oil for skin moisturizing and it’s also good for frying because of its high smoke point.

2. Here’s what red lentils look like:

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3. Comment about foam with canned beans. It’s totally normal and safe. Simply wash thoroughly. I’m looking for a thorough explanation still….

4. Fish suggestions – Minnesota fish – Walleye – make a maple pecan crust – use crushed pecans, butter, maple syrup, a bit of parsley, salt and pepper. Mix well, making a coarse crumbles. Then top the fish with the mix and broil or bake in oven. If broiling, have about 5 inches from heat source and be careful not to burn as the oils and sugar will do so. Probably broil for about 5 minutes. If baking, go 350 for about 10 minutes, check for firmness at about 7 minutes.

 

5-9-12 Insights & Questions

1. Olive oils – Oils –  There is a lot of information out there and frankly depending on what you read, it can be confusing. I use Spectrum brand oils so here’s a link with a wealth of knowledgeon the various types and purposes for using oils. As I mentioned during the presentation, we use extra virgin olive oil on our salads, raw veggies and for finishing. We use a regular olive oil for cooking. Sesame is good too, but it’s a strong flavor. We use a good quality coconut oil for skin moisturizing and it’s also good for frying because of its high smoke point.

2. Salts – it can be a controversial topic. Here’s salt info related to cooking Real Simple .

3. Olives – The Whole Foods (not associated with the grocery store) website is an excellent resource for nutritional information. Here’s info on olives.

4. Butter Nut Squash Soup recipe

5. Learn about farm and wild raised fish, and all the issues that go along with both – Monterray Bay Seafood Watch

6. Fish recipes – Try stuffed trout here. try broiled salmon.  OR simply take the filling mixture from the stuffed trout recipe and put it on top of other  fish like salmon, cod, halibut, pollock, tillapia and simply bake or broil. Delicious!

7. Here’s my hummus recipe – very easy, tastes great, and healthy too.

 

4-21-12 Insights & Questions during presentation

1. Cutting boards, I explain in this video – Have two boards – a plastic or composite type board for raw meats/fish/seafoods, and a second for non-raw meats, vegetables, fruits, etc.  I love Epicurean Cutting Surfaces and you can find these at most grocery or kitchen stores, and online. Bamboo is very durable as well. When using plastic cutting boards, if it starts flaking, you may want to get a new one, eating plastic with one’s food probably doesn’t taste good. Read my post on handling raw meats and cutting boards. This will explain how to clean your board too.

2. Mediterranean Restaurants in the twin cities. Good question,  Thanks to good old Minnesota tastes, the scope of this cuisine has been narrowed down to some basic tastes – gyros and tzazki sauce. But there are some places worth checking out. Try Saffron in Minneapolis (very swanky, but very delicious), Barbery Fig in St Paul, Mediterranean Cruise in Burnsville. I also like Caspian Sea and their market, though my Turkish wife says that’s shouldn’t be considered Mediterranean, it’s Persian. 

3. Knive brands to consider – Wustof, Victorinox, Shun, Henkels. My suggestion is to find something that feels sturdy and safe in your hand. If you want to invest in your knives, go for it. They will last forever if you take care of them. 

4. Types of fish that are not fishy tastiing – walleye, tilapia, cod, pollock. General rule of thumb. Fish should smell like ocean or lake, more like a sweet, fresh smell. If the fish actually smells fishy, that most likely means it’s not fresh at all and it’s bad. 

5. Learn about farm and wild raised fish, and all the issues that go along with both – Monterray Bay Seafood Watch

6. Fish recipes – Try stuffed trout here. try broiled salmon.  OR simply take the filling mixture from the stuffed trout recipe and put it on top of other  fish like salmon, cod, halibut, pollock, tillapia and simply bake or broil. Delicious!

7. Is there a difference in acidity with yellow or red tomatoes – supposedly yellow are lower in acidity, but I don’t know for a fact, and I cannot find anything that makes a concrete case for it. Definitely surf the web and/or ask a nutritionist/dietician.

8. Olive oils – Oils –  There is a lot of information out there and frankly depending on what you read, it can be confusing. I use Spectrum brand oils so here’s a link with a wealth of knowledgeon the various types and purposes for using oils. As I mentioned during the presentation, we use extra virgin olive oil on our salads, raw veggies and for finishing. We use a regular olive oil for cooking. Sesame is good too, but it’s a strong flavor. We use a good quality coconut oil for skin moisturizing and it’s also good for frying because of its high smoke point.

 

Food diagram created by: Oldways & Harvard School of Public Health